2006 Honda Pilot rear window not working

2006 honda pilot window not working

2006 honda pilot

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While this is written for the rear passenger window on the 2006 Honda Pilot it is not a vehicle specific issue this can happen to anyone on pretty much any vehicle. I mention this because a broken wire generally does not come to mind for most folks, and they usually run through all the normal components first as I list below, and that is of course the smart move but when all those do not fix the issue most people still wont think broken wire when its a common issue and easy to fix yourself. So before you start buying a munch of expensive parts be sure to check this first test your components before replacing and then the wire search it can save you a bundle.









Some time ago my parents 2006 Honda pilot rear window stopped working, they tried several things to try and remedy the problem to no avail. I offered to take a look and eventually did find the problem but it was not what anyone expected and its not something most people would intuitively think to check, Im going to share what it was and how I fixed it incase others sufferer the same problem.

The window just stopped working one day and as I remember it just suddenly ceased, during a trip to the store it was as far as Im aware sudden but because of the lock out feature on the drivers door panel it may have been sporadic at first and just blamed on the windows being locked.

We first checked and rechecked all the usual suspects.

1. Fuse panel by drivers feet
2. Fuse panel by front passenger feet (where all the window control fuses are)
3. fuse block under the hood both on passenger and drivers side
4. drivers window switch controls
5. Switch control at the actual window not functioning
6. The motor on the window not functioning..



We removed and checked every fuse related or not just to make sure, we pulled every switch and tested them was power being sent at the correct time (when toggled) was the window lock switch disengaging when toggled working from the front back to the actual window that was not working.



we then tested the motor to the window we did this by removing the door skin on that door then the plastic dust guard under it that covers the access ports I removed the connections between the motor and the wiring harness I used a multimeter to double check which was pos and which was Neg and then using a modified 12v testing probe.

a 12v lighted tester hard wired to allow a solid connection from probe tip to alligator clip


I grounded the Neg pin and applied 12v positive to the Pos pin the motor sprung t life. So this told me the problem was between the drivers switch control and the window motor.

****IMPORTANT****
when removing things make dam sure you do not mess with any of the SAS systems like seatbelts air bags etc this includes wires connected to the seatbelt coils and front seats, doing this especially the seats will require a trip to the dealer to have said systems recalibrated for the weights of the driver and passenger for airbag deployment. DON’T DO IT…..


***TIP***
Disconnect the battery before you start doing any repairs to the wiring so you do not cook the computer, I ran jumper cables from the battery to my working location so I had a 12v source to use if needed without having to have the car battery connected to the car.



2006 Honda Pilot rear passenger door wiring harness notice the clip is up if I pulled those wires would come out of the plastic connector pin and all


Knowing that the motor worked I started working a bit backwards the pins on the connectors had 12v coming through, but not knowing the exact wiring codes or how the can bus system functioned on it I was not exactly sure which ones should and should not have juice.



that’s when I noticed that power was not coming through from the drivers switch, I did this by again using my custom probe and alligator clip rig, when I connected the pin on the motor to the pin on the drivers switch the motor worked I was able to put the window up and down.

the problem had to be only one thing at that point and that’s a broken wire.

A probe that pierces wire insulation with a alligator clip from that probe to a multi meter for checking continuity over greater distances like the front to the rear of a vehicle. The easiest way to find a broken wire.


Using another custom rig, I attached an alligator clip to the pin on the wiring harness connecting into the rear window switch assembly and starting from the wires that travel under the drivers kick plate I used the probe to push through the insulation and connected to the Multimeter I checked for continuity. My particular meter makes an audible tone when there is continuity between the probes. Working backwards 18″ or so at a time I came to the problem.



I did have to remove much of the interior skins between the two as well as the rubber conduite between the car and the passenger door the speaker and misc connections, as inside the rubber conduite were several broken wires some completely broken others cracked and in the process of breaking, they were well inside the rubber flex conduit and trying to fix them in place would have been a colossal hassle and end up being a mickey mouse job at best.

I removed the wire rig completely, took pictures before during and after of the wires incase I forgot something during the fix on how they go back together this included the wires entering the connector because you can remove the pins from the clip via a flip up tab and if I had accidently pulled them out Id not have had a clue where they went back without a guide.

I removed them from the door and cut all the offenting wires that were cracked stripping them and the ones that were already broken completely off I put eat shrink on each individual wire as well as on the bundle before making the connections so once the connections were soldered and cooled I could slip the heat shrink over them and seal them accordingly.



****** IMPORTANT ******

Its important to remember your dealing with a Can Bus system and any drastic changes in the wire can negatively affect the system setting off all sorts of trouble codes and lights as well as causing weird shit to happen which can seem completely unrelated, in a dodge I worked on once a fix to a tail light screwed up the Mass airflow system and charging system so, try to keep lengthening and shortening wires etc to a bare minimum.

I used alligator clips as heat sinks so the heat shrink would not shrink while soldering which happens if your not prepared so its important to take preventive action.

Once I had soldered each connection cooled them and put the shrink in place I sealed the whole thing again as well as giving it a wrap in electrical tape to make up for the factory sheath that I had to cut off to make the repair. after that it all worked fine both from the drivers switch as well as the passenger switch panel. after that I just had to put it all back together.

While this is written for the rear passenger window on the 2006 Honda Pilot it is not a vehicle specific issue this can happen to anyone on pretty much any vehicle. I mention this because a broken wire generally does not come to mind for most folks, and they usually run through all the normal components first as I list below, and that is of course the smart move but when all those do not fix the issue most people still wont think broken wire when its a common issue and easy to fix yourself. So before you start buying a munch of expensive parts be sure to check this first test your components before replacing and then the wire search it can save you a bundle.

I hope this helped you out please remember to check out my youtube channel hit the like and subscribe it really helps me out toss a like or comment as well

Cheers



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